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Making an Entrance


The entrance of a home is your best opportunity to communicate your personality and style. It is the first part of your house that visitors will see, and therefore makes an important statement.

This is why the entrance door that you choose should speak to you as a homeowner. Are you open with your day-to-day activities, and wouldn't mind having more glass than solid material? Or do you like your privacy, and prefer as little glass as possible? Maybe you have a dramatic side, and find the prospect of a double-door entrance exciting. 

No matter who you are, there is an entrance door for you. Follow this guide to find the type of door that fits you and your home perfectly.


 
 
 

The Admired Stoop

 

This quartersawn entry should open into a home with formal introductions, followed by a cocktail party. The solid wood door demands respect and admiration, while the prairie style sidelights add color, transparency and interest. This entrance is for the proper entertainer; someone who wants neighbors to wonder what event they're hosting while preserving their privacy.


 
 

The Whimsical Port

 

This oak entry door expresses unique creativity through its stained glass, glass jewels, and intricate carvings. The owner of this door would have a sense of wonder about the world, and perhaps an art studio in some corner of their home. They would also look forward to seeing their visitors' faces framed by the gorgeous colors that outline the door's arched window, as well as the time of day when the sun would stream through the glass and casts the colors onto their walls.

 

 
 

The Dramatic Double Doors

 

The owner of this entrance door set would simply have to open both doors at once when greeting visitors. The detailed woodwork and beveled glass would catch the eye of anyone walking past this home, which is exactly the attention that the homeowner would expect. Additionally, the low windows would connect the outdoors with the indoors, allowing those inside to experience the excitement of the outside world from the comfort of the home.


 
 

The Open Door

 

This primarily glass front door belongs in a house set into the woods, where most visitors are expected, and privacy isn't a concern. The owner of this home would be a free spirit, living their life without worry of the outside world. Their home would be a retreat from the everyday hustle and bustle, bringing ease through natural surroundings.

 

Designing with Architectural Antiques


 

Even if you're a visual person, it can still be difficult to envision what designing with antiques would look like, especially within a more modern setting. That's why we have created three styled vignettes to demonstrate how antiques can be incorporated in a fresh, aesthetically pleasing way. Take a look below to get inspiration for your next design!

 

A Rustic Romantic Nook

We would imagine these elements to be a part of a quintessential breakfast nook, or a small eating area off of a kitchen. The industrial base table and oak benches perfectly balance the light distressed shiplap and white french doors. While the contrast of those elements makes the space seem more rustic-industrial, the ornate French chandelier adds a softer touch, acting as a romantic focal point by introducing curvilinear lines to the space. This type of interior style is perfect for those who want to combine modern, traditional, and rustic design.

 

A Bohemian Living Space

This eclectic room mixes metals, neutrals, and natural elements to create a cozy place to relax or entertain. Purely functional pieces, such as the chrome and leather chairs, provide context for the space's purpose. On the other hand, pieces such as the rustic work bench and library ladder add to the space's aesthetic appeal while also serving as storage or display. The combination of these antiques would appeal to those who want a relaxed, yet trendy living area.

 

A Retro Bathroom

If you're obsessed with color and pattern, then maybe you should go this retro route. Every element adds flair and character as only antiques can, while still appealing to modern design trends. The clean lines of the sink beautifully balance the ornamentation of the tub and globe pendant, and the fun faucet handles add a classic touch.

 

Browse our product page for more antiques for your space!


 

How to Find The Right Hanging Height For Your Chandelier


 

Finding the "right" chandelier for your dining room, kitchen, or living room can be a daunting, time-consuming (but fun!) process. With all the options out there; the different styles, materials, designs, colors... how do you choose?! Well, the first step is to stop by Architectural Antiques in Northeast Minneapolis and have a look through our extensive collection of antique chandeliers and lighting fixtures until, eventually, you find that perfect match for your industrial kitchen or for your Victorian dining room.  

Once you have your unique, one-of-a-kind chandelier from Architectural Antiques, you realize that you do not know exactly where to hang it. How high is too high? How low is too low? Does it depend on the size or the style of the chandelier? All you want is to just get your new fixture properly installed and hanging up as soon as possible so that all of your friends can come over and gawk at your amazing interior design skills.

Don't fret, finding the proper hanging height for your chandelier can be easier than you think, especially if you follow the simple guidelines and suggestions shown in the diagram below, for where to hang your chandelier above your dining room or kitchen table.

 
 

Further examples using various lighting pieces currently in our store:

These candle-style chandeliers are great examples of chandeliers that should not be placed too close to the ceiling, as it might look strange from an aesthetic standpoint, and could also be a potential fire hazard. These chandeliers, and ones similar to them, may serve better being hung lower and closer to the table's surface anyways, as their lights are facing up, instead of down towards the table, and therefore can better illuminate the space if hung lower.

 

These smaller chandeliers are great examples of lighting fixtures that should be hung lower and closer to the table's surface, for various reasons. Because of their smaller size and simple, geometric designs, they can have a greater presence and significant design impact in the room if they are hung lower, instead of hanging up close to the ceiling, where they may not stand out as much. They also can more effectively illuminate the space if hung lower.

 

Larger, more elaborate chandeliers can be hung higher, and further away from the table's surface.  Due to their large size, dramatic design, bright colors, and overall extravagant presence, they can hang higher and closer to the ceiling as they will still make a significant impact on the room as the main focal point, without overwhelming the space. Also, because of their larger size, they generally have stronger lighting ability, so they can hang higher and still effectively illuminate the space.

 

Remember: the best way to find the proper hanging height for your light is to test it out and try different options to see what works best for your individual, unique situation!